The First Spring Rains Bring Out Frogs and Salamanders

Rains that occurred several weeks ago in southeastern Oklahoma brought out all of the early spring frogs, including Spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), Cajun chorus frogs (Pseudacris fouquettei), Pickerel frogs (Lithobates palustris), and Southern crawfish frogs (Lithobates areolata). Even Southern leopard frogs (Lithobates sphenocephala) and American toads (Anaxyrus americanus) were active. In addition to running our traps at our primary research site in Le Flore County, we spent time driving roads at night in both Le Flore and McCurtain Counties. Nearly every roadside pond contained some mix of the above frog species. The only two that did not occur together were Pickerel and Crawfish frogs.

An adult Cajon chorus frog

An adult Cajun chorus frog

A number of amphibian species in Oklahoma breed during late winter and early spring, and their nearly deafening choruses can be easily experienced by driving around in rural areas at night. Males congregate in ponds when rains first begin, and their calls attract females that have spent the fall and winter converting energy that they stored from spring, summer, and fall activity into eggs. Examination of ponds during the daytime usually reveals many egg masses attached to vegetation or floating on the pond surfaces.

In addition to frogs that reveal their presence by calling, salamanders are moving into ponds to breed. We found large numbers of Spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) moving across roads heading for ponds during rains, and we captured some in our traps. Unlike frogs, salamanders do not vocalize. Whereas female frogs are attracted to individual males by the quality of the call, female salamanders are attracted to individual males by the quality of their courtship behavior.

An adult Spotted salamander

An adult Spotted salamander

So, for those of you are interested in amphibians, drive around in rural areas when it begins to rain and listen for frog choruses.  With the windows cracked, you can hear choruses in breeding ponds along the roads.  If you find a chorus on public property, put on your boots, turn on your good flashlight or headlight (preferred), and see if you can locate individual frogs that are calling. Chorus frogs are tiny and usually call inside grass clumps at the surface of the water. A Chorus frog calling right at your feet can be difficult to locate and requires persistence. If you are lucky enough to hear the low snoring calls of Pickerel or Crawfish frogs, you will need to move slowly without sloshing the water.  Even slight movement of the water caused these wary frogs to stop calling and dive below the surface. If you stand quietly for ten minutes or so, males will reappear and begin calling.

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3 Responses to “The First Spring Rains Bring Out Frogs and Salamanders”

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  3. Pete says:

    Pete…

    Good stuff, found your site through Google using the words ‘Boots’ by the way :-)…