Posts Tagged ‘turtles’

Dodging Turtles

Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

With the days getting warmer, box turtles begin moving around, often finding themselves on paved highways as they search for mates and good areas to feed. Not to be confused with rocks, box turtles will squish when run over. Similar to most other reptiles (and, interestingly Opossums and Armadillos), box turtles are oblivious to traffic. This might seem surprising, considering that turtles in general have excellent sight. For example, if you try to sneak up to a bunch of sliders basking on a log in a pond, you will be lucky to get within 100 yards of the turtles before they “slide” into the water. Of course, box turtles cannot slide into the water because they spend most of their time on land. Nevertheless, they see you from a long distance when approaching. When a box turtle detects something moving within the range of its eyes, it remains perfectly still, with its head up in a periscope-like fashion as shown in the first photo below. Box turtles are difficult to detect in their natural habitats if they do not move. If you are lucky enough to see one, by the time you get your camera set to photograph it, the turtle will likely pull its head and legs into the shell and close it.

Ornate Box Turtle with head up, remaining motionless in an attempt to be overlooked.

Ornate Box Turtle with head up, remaining motionless in an attempt to be overlooked.

Oklahoma has two species of box turtles, the Ornate Box Turtle, which is most common in western Oklahoma, and the Three-toed or Eastern Box Turtle, which is common in central and eastern Oklahoma. Both species occur in central Oklahoma, but the Ornate Box Turtle is less common. Like most animals, box turtles usually know where they are going when they head out across a highway. Given that an adult box turtle might be 40 years old or older, the highway may not have even been there when it hatched from an egg. Even if the highway is older than the individual turtle, neither highways nor cars are in the evolutionary history of box turtles. From the perspective of a box turtle, a highway is just a strange piece of ground that they have to cross to get where they are going.

Three-Toed Box Turtle caught in the act of feeding on some vegetation along the edge of a small pond. Three-toed Box Turtles are highly variable in coloration.

Three-Toed Box Turtle caught in the act of feeding on some vegetation along the edge of a small pond. Three-toed Box Turtles are highly variable in coloration.

How can you help? The best thing that you can do to help box turtles, is to watch for them on roads when either driving or sitting in a car. When you see one, the first thing to do is avoid running over it. If there is no traffic, you can stop and help it across the road. If you do stop and move a turtle (of any kind) be sure to set it well off the road and on the side it was heading for. However, keep in mind that roads and highways are dangerous for people as well, and you should not stop if doing so puts you in harm’s way. Simply paying attention and doing your best to avoid running over turtles goes a long way in helping them out. In addition, tell everyone that you know to start watching for and avoiding turtles on the highway.

Three-toed Box Turtle upside down with the shell completely closed. The lower shell (plastron) has two hinges which allow the turtle to close itself in the shell. Most turtle species cannot completely close the shell. Box turtles close the shell immediately when first disturbed and often remain this way for an hour or more. When they do come back out, they first partially open the front of the shell and peek out to see if they are safe.

Three-toed Box Turtle upside down with the shell completely closed. The lower shell (plastron) has two hinges which allow the turtle to close itself in the shell. Most turtle species cannot completely close the shell. Box turtles close the shell immediately when first disturbed and often remain this way for an hour or more. When they do come back out, they first partially open the front of the shell and peek out to see if they are safe.

Why should we care about turtles? First and foremost, turtles are part of the natural biodiversity of the planet, and as such, they play important ecological roles as grazers on fruits and predators on certain insects and other invertebrates. Second, they were here first. The first turtle fossils appeared in the mid Triassic, about 225 million years ago. Box Turtles are in the family Emydidae, which also includes Sliders, Painted Turtles, and Map Turtles, to mention a few. The family Emydidae dates back to at least the late Cretaceous, some 75–80 million years ago. The family that we belong to, the Hominidae, dates back only about 15 million years, and modern man (Homo sapiens) as we know it, dates back less than 200,000 years. Box turtles certainly have been in Oklahoma long before the influx of Europeans and even long before Native Americans settled the land. So, as Woody Guthrie sang in 1940, “This land is your land, this land is my land…”—we share the land with box turtles and all other native animal and plant life, and we should do our best to maintain that relationship.

Amphibians and Reptiles at the SNOMNH

Thursday, September 3rd, 2009
Male Broad-headed Skink showing breeding coloration
Male Broad-headed Skink showing breeding coloration

Hello, interested readers. Herpetologists at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in Norman have been monitoring amphibians and reptiles in southeastern Le Flore County for the past year and have run across some interesting aspects of the biology of these often abundant and visible animals. We are so excited about our findings, and herpetology in general, that we decided to create this blog to keep others around the state, the nation, and the world informed.

As some of you already know, Dr. Laurie Vitt and Dr. Janalee Caldwell (us!) have spent many years studying amphibians and reptiles in the United States, Central America, South America, and a few other exotic places. We are professional researchers, but like most people who are fortunate enough to be paid for what they love to do, we started out by observing amphibians, reptiles, and other animals in their natural habitats when we were just children. So, in a sense, we never grew up! What we have learned directly from these animals is remarkable, and as you will see in the forthcoming blogs, the natural world is even stranger and more interesting than anything that we could make up.

We hope that you will join us by keeping up with our blog, and we will do our best to provide you with interesting information on these fascinating animals. For those of you who are particularly interested in amphibians and reptiles of Oklahoma, we invite you to visit our web personal pages, and more specifically, to examine the web pages that we have prepared for some of the Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) around the state, in collaboration with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. We now have three WMA web pages, Packsaddle, Atoka, and Cookson, and all can be accessed from our WMA web page (http://www.snomnh.ou.edu/personnel/herpetology/vitt/WMA/index.shtml). We are working on more. We also have web pages for some of our South American research sites. So, for now, welcome to our blog, keep checking, and feast your imagination on this beautiful male Broad-Headed Skink from the Cookson Hills in NE Oklahoma.