Cynomys ludovicianus (Black-tailed Prairie Dog)
Counties where this species is known to occur are highlighted in blue.
Click here to enlarge map.
Habitat: Shortgrass prairies, including Piñon-Juniper Mesas, Shortgrass High Plains, Mixed-grass Plains, Mesquite-Grass Plains, and in the western edge of the Post Oak-Blackjack Uplands.

Habits: Black-tailed Prairie Dogs are very social, and live in large groups called colonies or towns. These can be subdivided into wards and coteries. Mounds are complex systems that serve as lookout posts, as a means of ventilation of the burrow system, as a means to keep water from entering the burrow, among others. When threatened by predators, a warning call is given, which sounds a lot like a “bark.” Mating occurs in winter or spring; four to five young are born per litter. The adults move out and leave the town to establish new burrows, leaving the old systems to the young prairie dogs when they come of age. They eat primarily grass. At one time, the distribution of Black-tailed Prairie Dogs covered a vast portion of Oklahoma; now only small, scattered, widely separated populations are found in the state.


Artiodactyla
 - 
Carnivora
 - 
Chiroptera
 - 
Didelphimorphia
 - 
Insectivora
 - 
Lagomorpha
 - 
Rodentia
 - 
Xenarthra
Scientific Names - Common Names

For more information, view the Mammalian Species account for this species.

Search the OMNH Collections for Cynomys ludovicianus.