Lontra canadensis (Northern River Otter)
Counties where this species is known to occur are highlighted in blue.
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Habitat: Rivers, creeks, and other bodies of water.

Habits: Northern River Otters are seen at night and in the daytime, but are very shy and rare animals. They eat mostly frogs and fish, but will consume other small mammals and reptiles. Dens are made in banks, old beaver lodges, or under rocky ledges. River Otters have two to three young per litter, and they stay with the mother for about a year. Otters do not hibernate. They can swim for a quarter of a mile on one breath of air. They are social and are well known for their playful behavior. Northern River Otters probably were extinct in Oklahoma by the 1950s; since this time otters have been reintroduced and are recolonizing parts of the state.


Artiodactyla
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Carnivora
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Chiroptera
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Didelphimorphia
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Insectivora
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Lagomorpha
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Rodentia
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Xenarthra
Scientific Names - Common Names

For more information, view the Mammalian Species account for this species.

Search the OMNH Collections for Lontra canadensis.